Research

Laser Therapy Research

Laser Therapy U’s online research portal houses an extensive collection of published studies, articles and abstracts from around the world.

Sort through our entire research database using the filter tool above.

Be sure to check back frequently…new items are added weekly!

Low-Power Laser Treatment in Patients with Frozen Shoulder: Preliminary Results

Photomedicine and Laser Surgery

Apostolos Stergioulas

4/9/2008 - Apostolos Stergioulas. Photomedicine and Laser Surgery. April 2008, 26(2): 99-105. doi:10.1089/pho.2007.2138.
Objective: In this study I sought to test the efficacy of low-power laser therapy (LLLT) in patients with frozen shoulder. Background Data: The use of low-level laser energy has been recommended for the management of a variety of musculoskeletal disorders. Materials and Methods: Sixty-three patients with frozen shoulder were randomly assigned into one of two groups. In the active laser group (n = 31), patients were treated with a 810-nm Ga-Al-As laser with a continuous output of 60 mW applied to eight points on the shoulder for 30 sec each, for a total dose of 1.8 J per point and 14.4 J per session. In the placebo group (n = 32), patients received placebo laser treatment. During 8 wk of treatment, the patients in each group received 12 sessions of laser or placebo, two sessions per week (for weeks 1–4), and one session per week (for weeks 5–8). Results: Relative to the placebo group, the active laser group had: (1) a significant decrease in overall, night, and activity pain scores at the end of 4 wk and 8 wk of treatment, and at the end of 8 wk additional follow-up (16 wk post-randomization); (2) a significant decrease in shoulder pain and disability index (SPADI) scores and Croft shoulder disability questionnaire scores at those same intervals; (3) a significant decrease in disability of arm, shoulder, and hand questionnaire (DASH) scores at the end of 8 wk of treatment, and at 16 wk post treatment; and (4) a significant decrease in health-assessment questionnaire (HAQ) scores at the end of 4 wk and 8 wk of treatment. There was some improvement in range of motion, but this did not reach statistical significance. Conclusions: The results suggested that laser treatment was more effective in reducing pain and disability scores than placebo at the end of the treatment period, as well as at follow-up.